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  • Question in Julia Goedecke's contributions by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    Example of an explore mode question. Student is given a 2x2 matrix and is asked to find the characteristic polynomial and eigenvalues, and then eigenvectors for each eigenvalue. The part asking for eigenvectors can be repeated as often as the student wants, to be used for different eigenvalues.

    Assessed: calculating characteristic polynomial and eigenvectors.

    Feature: any correct eigenvector is recognised by the marking algorithm, also multiples of the "obvious" one(s) (given the reduced row echelon form that we use to calculate them).

    Randomisation: a random true/false for invertibility is created, and the eigenvalues a and b are randomised (condition: two different evalues, and a=0 iff invertibility is false), and a random invertible 2x2 matrix with determinant 1 or -1 is created (via random elementary row operations) to change base from diag(a,b) to the matrix for the question. Determinant 1 or -1 ensures that we keep integer entries.

    The implementation uses linear algebra functions such as "find reduced echelon form" or "find kernel of a reduced echelon form", from the extension "linalg2".

  • Example of an explore mode question. Student is given a 3x3 matrix and is asked to find the characteristic polynomial and eigenvalues, and then eigenvectors for each eigenvalue. The part asking for eigenvectors can be repeated as often as the student wants, to be used for different eigenvalues.

    Assessed: calculating characteristic polynomial and eigenvectors.

    Feature: any correct eigenvalue will be recognised by the marking algorithm, even multiples of the obvious one(s) (which can be read off from the reduced row echelon form)

    Randomisation: Not randomised, just using particular matrices. I am still working on how to randomise this for 3x3; a randomised 2x2 version exists. I have several different versions for 3x3 (not all published yet), so I could make a random choice between these in a test.

    The implementation uses linear algebra functions such as "find reduced echelon form" or "find kernel of a reduced echelon form", from the extension "linalg2".

  • Question in Julia Goedecke's contributions by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    Student finds a basis for kernel and image of a matrix transformation. Any basis can be entered; there is a custom marking algorithm which checks if it is a correct basis.

    There are options to adjust this question fairly easily, for example to get different variants for practice and for a test, by changing the options in the "pivot columns" in the variables. You should be careful to think about and test your pivot options, as some are easier or harder than others, and some don't work very well.

  • Question in Julia Goedecke's contributions by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    Educational calculation tool rather than "question".

    This allows the student to input a linear system in augmented matrix form (max rows 5, but any number of variables). Then the student can decide to swap some rows, or multiply some rows, or add multiples of one row to other rows. The student only has to input what operation should be performed, and this is automatically applied to the system. This question has no marks and no feedback as it's just meant as a "calculator".

    It has some rounding to 13 decimal places, as otherwise some fraction calculations become incorrectly displayed as a very small number instead of 0.

    It would be possible to extend to more than 5 rows, one just has to put in a lot more variables and so on. I just had to choose some place to stop.

  • Matrix multiplication. Has automatically generated "unresolved" matrix product to write in the solution, which is the interesting part of this implementation.

  • Finding a matrix from a formula for each entry, which involves the row and column numbers of that entry. Randomized size of the matrices and formula.

    The interesting part about the implementation is the way the output is generated for "Advice".

  • Question in Julia Goedecke's contributions by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    Educational calculation tool rather than "question".

    This allows the student to input a square matrix (max rows 5). Then the student can decide to swap some rows, or multiply some rows, or add multiples of one row to other rows. The student only has to input what operation should be performed, and this is automatically applied to the matrix and the identity matrix (or what it has got to). This question has no marks and no feedback as it's just meant as a "calculator". It has some checks in so students know when they are not entering a square matrix or a valid row number etc.

    It has some rounding to 13 decimal places, as otherwise some fraction calculations become incorrectly displayed as a very small number instead of 0.

    It would be possible to extend to more than 5 rows, one just has to put in a lot more variables and so on. I just had to choose some place to stop.

  • Question in Julia Goedecke's contributions by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    Student decides on four different examples whether two subspaces form a direct sum and whether the sum is the whole vectorspace.

    No randomisation, just the four examples. The question is set in explore mode, so that after deciding, students are asked to give reasons for their choices.

  • Question in Linear Algebra 1st year by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 2 others

    This allows the student to input a linear system in augmented matrix form (max rows 5, but any number of variables). Then the student can decide to swap some rows, or multiply some rows, or add multiples of one row to other rows. The student only has to input what operation should be performed, and this is automatically applied to the system. This question has no marks and no feedback as it's just meant as a "calculator".

  • Question in Linear Algebra 1st year by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    Given vectors $\boldsymbol{v}$ and $\boldsymbol{w}$, find their inner product.

  • Question in Linear Algebra 1st year by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    Given vectors $\boldsymbol{v}$ and $\boldsymbol{w}$, find their inner product.

  • Example of an explore mode question. Student is given a 2x2 matrix with eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and is asked to decide if the matrix is invertible. If yes, second and third parts are offered where the student should give the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the inverse matrix.

    Assessed: remembering link between 0 eigenvalue and invertibility. Remembering link between eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrix and its inverse.

    Randomisation: a random true/false for invertibility is created, and the eigenvalues a and b are randomised (condition: two different evalues, and a=0 iff invertibility is false), and a random invertible 2x2 matrix with determinant 1 or -1 is created (via random elementary row operations) to change base from diag(a,b) to the matrix for the question. Determinant 1 or -1 ensures that we keep integer entries.

    The implementation uses linear algebra functions such as "find reduced echelon form" or "find kernel of a reduced echelon form", from the extension "linalg2".

  • Adding 2x2 matrices
    Ready to use
    Question in Linear Algebra 1st year by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    Adding 2x2 matrices. Very simple question. Marks per correct entry.

  • Matrix multiplication. Contains a function that will let you print the calculation steps of matrix multiplication, e.g. in the Advice.

  • In this demo question, you can see either 2 or 3 gaps depending on the variable \(m\), and the marking algorithm doesn't penalise for the empty third gap in cases when it is not shown.

    Reason to use it: for vectors or matrices containing only numbers, one can easily use matrix entry to account for a random size of an answer. But this does not work for mathematical expressions. There we have to give each entry of the vector as a separate gap, which then becomes a problem when the size varies. This solves that problem. For this reason I've included two parts: one very simple one that just shows the phenomenon of variable number of gaps, and one which is more like why I  needed it.

    Note that to resolve the fact that when \(m=2\), the point for the third gap cannot be earned, I have made it so that the student only gets 0 or all points, when all shown gaps are correctly filled in.

    Note the use of Ax[m-1] in the third gap "correct answer" of part b): if you use Ax[2], then it will throw an error when m=2, as then Ax won't have the correct size. So even though the marking algorithm will ignore it, the question would still not work.

    Bonus demo if you look in the variables: A way to automatically generate the correct latex code for \(\var{latexAx}\), since it's a variable size. I would usually  need that in the "Advice", i.e. solutions, rather than the question text.

  • In this demo question, you can see either 2 or 3 gaps depending on the variable \(m\), and the marking algorithm doesn't penalise for the empty third gap in cases when it is not shown.

    Reason to use it: for vectors or matrices containing only numbers, one can easily use matrix entry to account for a random size of an answer. But this does not work for mathematical expressions. There we have to give each entry of the vector as a separate gap, which then becomes a problem when the size varies. This solves that problem. For this reason I've included two parts: one very simple one that just shows the phenomenon of variable number of gaps, and one which is more like why I  needed it.

    Note that to resolve the fact that when \(m=2\), the point for the third gap cannot be earned, I have made it so that the student only gets 0 or all points, when all shown gaps are correctly filled in.

    Note the use of Ax[m-1] in the third gap "correct answer" of part b): if you use Ax[2], then it will throw an error when m=2, as then Ax won't have the correct size. So even though the marking algorithm will ignore it, the question would still not work.

    Bonus demo if you look in the variables: A way to automatically generate the correct latex code for \(\var{latexAx}\), since it's a variable size. I would usually  need that in the "Advice", i.e. solutions, rather than the question text.

  • Demo of automatically generating latex strings to out put vectors/matrices of variable size and that are calculated by some formula.

  • Marking algorithm that allows NA or any correct counterexample.

  • Checking whether a given set is a plane or not. Depends on whether two vectors are parallel or not. Then checking whether the plane goes through the origin. This is not always obvious from the presentation.

    Not randomised because it's the same as in our workbook.

  • Negative vectors
    Ready to use

    give the negative of each of two vectors. One always has 5 entries, the other has a random number of entries.

  • Abstract linear combinations. "Surreptitious" preview of bases and spanning sets, but not explicitely mentioned. There is no randomisation because it is just an abstract question. For counter-examples, any valid counter-example is accepted.

  • Finding a matrix from a formula for each entry, which involves the row and column numbers of that entry. Randomized size of the matrices and formula.

  • Calculate matrix times vector.

  • First compute matrix times vector for specific vectors. Then determine domain and codomain and general formula for the matrix transformation defined by the matrix.

    Randomising the number of rows in the matrix, m, makes the marking algorithm for part c) slightly complicated: it checks whether it should include the third gap or not depending on the variable m. For the correct distribution of marks, it is then necessary to do "you only get the marks if all gaps are correct". Otherwise the student would only get 2/3 marks when m=2, so the third gap doesn't appear.

  • Question in Linear Algebra 1st year by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    This allows the student to input a linear system in augmented matrix form (max rows 5, but any number of variables). Then the student can decide to swap some rows, or multiply some rows, or add multiples of one row to other rows. The student only has to input what operation should be performed, and this is automatically applied to the system. This question has no marks and no feedback as it's just meant as a "calculator".

  • Use matrix multiplication to get an equation for \(k\) which is then to be solved.

  • Calculate matrix times vector.

  • Checking whether a given set is a plane or not. Depends on whether two vectors are parallel or not. Then checking whether the plane goes through the origin. This is not always obvious from the presentation.

    Not randomised because it's the same as in our workbook.

  • To understand matrix multiplication in terms of linear combinations of column vectors.

  • Question in Linear Algebra 1st year by Picture of Julia Goedecke Julia Goedecke and 1 other

    Adding matrices of random size: two to four rows and two to four columns. Advice (i.e. solution) has conditional visibility to show only the correct size.